Articles - Southfield Periodontist - Joseph R. Nemeth, DDS & Associates

Articles

How to Brush Your Teeth

Brushing your teeth is probably a standard part of your daily routine, but chances are you aren’t following the American Dental Association’s guidelines for cleaning your teeth properly. The ADA currently recommends that you brush your teeth at minimum of two times each day – preferably morning and night or anytime you eat foods that…

Electric Brush vs. Manual Brushes

Preventative dentistry is about more than just visiting your dentist twice yearly for an exam and thorough cleaning. In fact, the majority of your preventative care is done at-home as a part of your normal hygienic routine. Many residents use manual toothbrushes to remove debris and plaque from their teeth. However, electric brushes have become…

How to Floss Your Teeth

Flossing is an important part of an oral hygiene routine, but research suggests that fewer than half of Americans do so daily. Flossing is simple and only takes an extra couple of minutes per day. Developing a healthy habit of flossing can prevent tooth decay and gum disease, and it may allow you to keep…

Gingivitis & Periodontitis

Gingivitis and periodontitis are gum diseases caused by a proliferation of bacteria along and beneath the periodontal tissues. Gingivitis is the mildest form of periodontal disease, beginning with minor symptoms like gum inflammation. Although it is highly treatable, gingivitis is often left untreated and allowed to progress into an advanced stage of a periodontal disease…

Causes of Periodontal Disease

Periodontal disease is common among dental patients and is the leading cause of tooth loss among American adults. It develops as the result of an accumulation of harmful bacteria harbored in hardened plaque on the teeth both above and beneath the gum line. Plaque is usually brushed or flossed away; but plaque allowed to remain…

Signs & Symptoms of Periodontal Disease

Periodontal disease – also known as gingivitis and periodontitis – is most easily identified by the visible symptoms it causes as it progresses. In its beginning stages, a periodontal disease often causes no symptoms at all, making it difficult for the average person to notice. With time, bacteria begin causing inflammation in the gums, which…

Types of Periodontal Disease

Periodontal disease is one of the most common diseases in America, affecting nearly 65 million adults over age 30. There are two types of periodontal disease – gingivitis and periodontitis. Each refers to an accumulation of bacteria along the gum line though one is more severe than the other. Gingivitis – the least invasive form of…

What is Periodontal Disease?

Periodontal disease is a highly common infection of the periodontal tissues (gums and bone) that are responsible for supporting the teeth. These infections are caused by bacteria that grow on the teeth near the gum line due to poor brushing and flossing practices. Periodontal disease is known as gingivitis during its earliest stages, which is…

What is a Periodontist?

A periodontist is a dentist who has undergone additional specialty training beyond dental school pertaining to the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of gum diseases. While general dentists often treat the mildest cases of periodontal disease, most patients with moderate to advanced gum disease are referred to periodontists. A periodontist can carry out complex periodontal treatments…

Post Op for Periodontics

A periodontal operation is a surgery to restore gum tissue lost to periodontal disease, improve the cosmetic appearance of one’s smile, or otherwise prepare the teeth for restorative prosthetics. Periodontal surgery is performed under local anesthesia – usually from the comfort of a dental office. Though there is little or no discomfort associated with the…